Hospital Bed Revisited: Well Done A&E

Some days turn up side down in moments. Today was my back to work day. But it turned out to be a hospital day instead.

As I sat with my auntie in A & E I couldn’t help remembering the last time she was brought into hospital. Of course when I get to a certain age I expect bits of me will get grumble and need attention. So I know that my auntie may find herself relying on this kind of care more that I would like. She’s been embracing all sorts of physical problems for a lot of years. Aging tends to bring us all to the recognition that our bodies tend to develop physical limitations. I guess I’m glad it’s not limitations of her mind that trouble her. I know it can’t be avoided though and she wasn’t the only elderly person in a cubicle.

It struck me that many independent older people really struggle to accept help. I suspect I might be exactly the same myself. Yet the staff were patient, polite and caring. Even with people waiting in the corridor as the morning picked up pace. Unfortunately there were no free cubicles because there were no hospital beds. The wards were full already. That stood out from the last time we were there. As I sat in the cubicle overnight that time to see if a bed would become free I wrote my blog on paper to type up later. It’s clear to me the pressure hasn’t eased any for these dedicated people. Around 1pm a whole load of juggling began to see if anyone could be moved to side wards or discharged. Not easy decisions to make but the pile up was getting worse.

Once again I thought about the importance of hospital beds. If my auntie ended up needing one it might be another long wait.

I feel it’s too simplistic to argue that we should privatise care, restrict care or divert people to GP surgeries. After all, the earliest appointment she could get to see her own GP was 13 June unless she phoned in at 8am in the morning for an emergency slot. One of the things I know we are really fortunate to have is a health care system that covers everyone for everything. In some other countries this morning’s visit to the hospital would have cost thousands. Money that she doesn’t have. The fact that she could get treated for free was a blessing. So how do we respond to the taking away or slow dismantling of such a system? Should we even be doing that in the first place?

My Guides were sitting with me as I watched my auntie sleep for a while. I understand that she will have to depart for the next life at some time. But I confess that I’d rather keep her here with us as long as possible. How would that happen without the hospital care? I felt an immense gratitude towards those people who are working to make sure that she still has quality of life. We all sat sending out healing to everyone in the department. It must be soul destroying at times for the staff. When they said she could go home I was thankful. But left wondering what the solution was. How to ensure that sick people can get help to be well again? Perhaps the staring point is to help people learn how to stay in energy balance.

Our physical body will fade out. It’s time is limited. But I can help myself avoid putting pressure on the hospital if I focus on my own wellbeing.

Keeping my energy clear and balanced. Letting go of stuckness and seeking positive energy. Listening to the signals of my body and dealing with them as quickly as possible. Using my intuitive healing ability on myself. Asking for the healing support from the Energy Beings who work with me. There are so many ways to achieve wellbeing if I wish to do so. Perhaps I also need to be active in the debate¬†about our health services. I do believe it’s time for more holistic approaches, more listening ear sessions and intuitive connections to what dis-ease is. Instead of the medical model I’d like to suggest the holistic model. Medicine has it’s place in treating illness but there is scope for so much more.

My auntie is home and I’m grateful. She has had large blasts of energy healing and I’m grateful for that too. I appreciate everything the A & E staff did for her. But I recognise it’s time for change. We escaped sitting in the corridor and cubicle for 14 hours this time. Others haven’t been so lucky. Nor are the staff who have to deal with this on a daily basis. Whenever you can please send a positive healing thought to the people in hospital beds, the staff caring for them and the families affected by illness. Finally, if you want to change the system then you have to enter the debate. It’s no good waiting until you need the A & E department!

Day 554 of my blogging challenge 

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